Portrait Shoot: Jack

Jack

Headshot of Jack. 50mm f/2.8 1/100 ISO200. OCF: Speedlight. 2’x3′ Softbox. CL.

Jack needed some basic portrait shots for his social media profiles. Like Marissa and Tommy’s portrait shoots, we started at Peace Park in Columbia, MO. After gathering the standard outdoor pictures we moved to another location on the other end of the University of Missouri campus.

View the full portrait shoot on Flickr

Equipment

Jack

Jack in Peace Park. 50mm f/2.8 1/400 ISO400. Natural Light.

The majority of Jack’s shoot was done with the wonderful little Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 paired with my Canon T2i/550D. The 50 1.8 is positively the best bang for your buck lens on the market, and it’s really capable of producing some fantastic images. I also used the Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 for a few telephoto shots.

The major equipment change for this particular shoot was with the off camera flash lighting. I recently purchased a Fotodiox 2’x3′ soft box, and this was the first proper shoot I used it in. The soft box has been an invaluable addition to my arsenal. Though my shoot-through umbrella produced some really nice light for portrait work, it throws light all over the scene. The soft box allowed me to light Jack with some really pleasing light without blasting light all over the background too. This allowed me to really isolate Jack from the background when using the soft box.

The Shoot

Jack

Jack full body shot. 50mm f/2.8 1/100 ISO200. OCF: Speedlight. 2’x3′ Softbox. CL.

The shoot went off without a hitch. We were able to get a number of shots that I was happy with in the relatively short shoot.

My new 2’x3′ soft box is significantly more difficult to haul around than my little shoot-through umbrella. It takes up quite a bit of space, and it’s a little cumbersome to carry around and set up. Though it doesn’t take off like a sail in windy conditions like the umbrella, I think I’m going to stick with the umbrella for the majority of my future outdoor shoots. That’s not to say the soft box isn’t useful. It definitely opens up quite a few more possibilities in a controlled environment.

View the full portrait shoot on Flickr